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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
to show here in the u.s. is much more about the family and the house again, the world of downton abbey we have grown to love to see, the machinations and how all of that plays out. it wouldn't be enough just to have the lady, you need the upstairs and downstairs. >> you need the yin and the yang. >> they mirror each other and affect each other, the lives of the downstairs people intertwined with the people upstairs. and you needed that contrast, i think. >> somebody has to polish the silver. >> absolutely. >> that is very effective. he think also the success is the beginning of recognizable history, i mean my mother was born in 1919, my dad was born in 1908. >> rose: mine too about then. >> so we see telephones and see the things we take for granted now, the telephones, cars, electricity creeping into society so it is not removed this the way the jane austen historical dramas are which are bustles and bonnets. >> this is the beginning of our recognized history now and i think that adds to the immediacy of the way. >> rose: were you born with that voice or acquire it? >> it was misspent yo
abuse, those all kind of travel together. but it's also very common in civilian life so in the u.s. general population, estimates of similar around 2 to 3% of people have post trautic stress dirder in their lifetime. some people are more likely to develop ptsd because of their occupations. a lot of post traumatic stress disorder in firefighters, in policemen and women. and then as eric also mentioned, more ptsd in the general population in women than in men in large part because of the kinds of traumatic experiences women are often exposed to, domestic violence, sexual trauma and the like. >> rose: is the core here the fear, whether it's from war or from civilian life, thideaf the constant fear of being assaulted? >> so the core is really that something life threatening has happened to profoundly change the individual's view of the world and their expectations. and a big part of it then is this ongoing fear that it could recur, it could happen again, it's going to come back opinions when did you first notice it, john. when did you become aware that what you had been experiencing mi
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)